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Where fierce, fresh writing lives. Here you’ll find opinions, profiles, poetry, stories, reviews, treasures from our archives and food for the mind. All the things you need to go down swinging.

 
Going Down Swinging is one of Australia’s longest-running and most respected literary journals: publishing digital as well as print and audio anthologies since 1979 and producing sensational, sold-out live events.
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Everything from sound projects to spoken word, from past editions and new content commissioned for online publication.

Going Down Swinging is one of Australia’s longest-running and most respected literary journals: publishing digital as well as print and audio anthologies since 1979 and producing sensational, sold-out live events.
gds_read_icon_dark

READ

Where fierce, fresh writing lives. Here you’ll find opinions, profiles, poetry, stories, reviews, treasures from our archives and food for the mind. All the things you need to go down swinging.

gds_listen_icon_dark

LISTEN

Everything from sound projects to spoken word, from past editions and new content commissioned for online publication.

Don't Read This Review Until You Read This Book

Mitch Alexander on why everyone should read House of Leaves.

How to Bend Language to Your Will (in Eight Easy Steps)

‘What’s in a name?’ Voldemort might ask. ‘A rose by any other name would smell just as sweet.’ But would it? Would a Blose™, with a smell to ‘blow...

The Latest from The Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge:

The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown

Idiot Wind

"The story of my birth is short and brutal." — Daniel East

Irish Orphan Immigration

New spoken word and poetry from GDS contributor Tiggy Johnson, who also provides a commentary on the creative work that emerged from her research into the Earl Grey Scheme of...

The Value of Writing

First, a pop quiz: which of these three statements is true? 1. When I went to school, I learnt to swim. I am now an Olympic swimmer. 2. I...

Why Do You Write Poetry? – Frank X. Walker

Adam Ford tracks down poets and asks them the most difficult of questions: ‘Why do you write poetry?’